Jessie Cornell, MSW, has her master's degree in social work and has had the honor of working for the Alzheimer's Association for three years. Her passion is to empower persons with Alzheimer's disease and their care-partners and all sectors of the society in their work to create dementia-friendly communities.

Jessie Cornell, MSW, has her master’s degree in social work and has had the honor of working for the Alzheimer’s Association for three years. 

You are invited to join the Community Conversation: “Still Alice” and the state of Alzheimer’s in Vermont, March 4, 6:00-7:30 pm at the Fletcher Free Library

Art imitates life. The much-anticipated film Still Alice, based on the book of the same name by neuroscientist Lisa Genova, was developed in consultation with Alzheimer’s Association experts who worked with the writers, directors and actors to guide the accuracy of diagnosis, current research, the progression of the disease, challenges the person with Alzheimer’s face and interpersonal scenarios. In the film Moore portrays Dr. Alice Howland, a linguistics professor diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s. Sandy Oltz, age 50 and an Alzheimer’s Association, National Early Stage Advisor, who is living with Alzheimer’s disease volunteered to partner with Moore to share her personal experience and help guide character development.

Alzheimer’s disease is a public health epidemic. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the only cause of death among the top 10 that cannot be prevented, cured, or even slowed. More than five million Americans, approximately 11,000 of which are Vermonters, are living with Alzheimer’s disease at a cost to the nation of $214 billion a year. The number of people with Alzheimer’s is expected to more than triple by 2050 if we do not find a way to prevent, slow or stop the disease. Alzheimer’s is not just a disease of old age. Approximately 200,000 Americans have younger-onset, which affects people younger than 65. Alzheimer’s disease is the ultimate thief – it steals memories, independence, control, and eventually life.

Sandy Oltz (r), age 50, who is living with Alzheimer’s disease volunteered to partner with Julianne Moore to share her personal experience and help guide character development.

Sandy Oltz (r), age 50, who is living with Alzheimer’s disease volunteered to partner with Julianne Moore to share her personal experience and help guide character development.

The film provides an important opportunity to raise awareness. With Julianne Moore winning the Oscar for Best Actress the film has propelled Alzheimer’s into forefront of the American social dialogue. By providing a frank and open portrayal of just how devastating Alzheimer’s disease is, our hope is that Still Alice will move more people to take an active role to wipeout Alzheimer’s.

Join us on Wednesday, March 4 as the Alzheimer’s Association, Vermont Chapter presents, Community Conversations: Still Alice and the state of Alzheimer’s in Vermont.
Alzheimer’s Association staff member Jessie Cornell, MSW, Community Outreach Specialist will facilitate an interactive dialogue about the impact of Alzheimer’s on Vermonters and the book “Still Alice” which chronicles the experiences of a woman diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s. Clips from the award winning film Still Alice will be shown and discussed as well as research initiatives, available resources and ways you can help us reach our vision of a world without Alzheimer’s. The program will be held at Fletcher Free Library from 6:00-7:30pm and is free and open to the public. To reserve your seat call the Alzheimer’s Association 24/7 helpline at 800.272.3900.

Learn more about the Memory Program at The University of Vermont Medical Center. 

Jessie Cornell has her master’s degree in social work and has had the honor of working for the Alzheimer’s Association for 3 years. Her passion is to empower persons with Alzheimer’s and their care-partners and all sectors of the society in their work to create dementia friendly communities.

About the Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association is the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.

 

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