Time to schedule that colonoscopy! March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Among cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. It is one of only a few cancers that can be prevented through screening. Visit the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable Web site to learn more.

James Vecchio, MD, is Medical Director of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Vermont Medical Center.

James Vecchio, MD, is Medical Director of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Vermont Medical Center.

What are the myths associated with colonoscopy?

Myth #1: Some people feel colonoscopy is embarrassing.

It is important to know and realize the members of the nursing staff and hospital staff are professionals and will do their best to make you feel very relaxed and comfortable prior and during the procedure.

Myth #2: Colon cancer only happens to other people.

Data show 5-6 percent of US population will develop colon cancer in their lifetime. Anyone over the age of 50 of either sex is at risk of developing colorectal cancer and should be screened.

Myth #3: Colorectal cancer screening is too expensive.

Most insurance plans fully cover most forms of colorectal cancer screening.

Myth #4: There is no way I can take the colon cleansing preparation for colonoscopy.

The newly offered “split dose” cleansing preparation is more tolerable and provides excellent results.

Myth #5: Colonoscopy will be painful.

You will be sedated prior to and during the colonoscopy and many times you will have no recollection of the procedure.

Myth #6: I do not have the time for colorectal cancer screening.

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths among men and women. Colorectal cancer may be prevented and some form of colorectal cancer screening test should be undertaken.

Learn more about colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment at the University of Vermont Medical Center.

James Vecchio, MD, is Medical Director of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of Vermont Medical Center.

 

Subscribe to Our Blog

Comments