Who loves maple syrup? We do! Vermonters have been harvesting it for hundreds of years. Syrup is made by boiling sap into a concentrated form. You can use it to top pancakes or waffles, mix into a salad dressing, or create a simple glaze for roasted vegetables.

Recently, maple syrup was named a “superfood.” Tests on the syrup found that it contains compounds which could help manage Type 2 diabetes, as well as acting as anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

Researchers also found that many of the antioxidant compounds, which prevent the oxidation and aging of the body’s cells, aren’t found in other natural sweeteners. So, the next time you make a cup of joe, add some maple syrup to sweeten it.

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Maple and Mustard Root Vegetables

Vermonters have been harvesting maple for hundreds of year. Syrup is made by boiling sap into a concentrated form. Use it to top pancakes or waffles, mix into a salad dressing, or create a simple glaze for roasted vegetables.
6
  • 1/4cupmaple syrup
  • 2TbspDijon mustard
  • 1/2tspgarlic powder
  • 2Tbspolive oil
  • 1/2tspsalt
  • 1/4tsppepper
  • 1/2cupcoarsely chopped onion
  • 5cupscoarsely chopped root vegetables (parnsips, rutabaga, carrot, beets, etc)
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Toss root veggies and onions with olive oil, salt, and pepper and spread evenly on a baking sheet. Roast for about 45 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes or so.
  2. Combine maple syrup, Dijon mustard, and garlic powder in a small bowl. Drizzle over veggies and mix to coat well.
  3. Return veggies to oven and cook under tender, and glaze has begun to caramelize.
Vermont Maple Sugar Makers Association
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